Patient Lifts & Slings

Shopping for Patient Lifts and Slings Made Easy

  • FREE SHIPPING on EVERY Patient Lift  we Sell
  • Every Patient Lift  we sell ships brand new with a warranty
  • We are not just the lowest priced we have the most educated staff on patient lifts and slings.
  • Unlike our competitors we know what we are selling and we want you to call us after the sale for your warranty issues and your replacement parts.
  • Most Patient Lifts ship same day with no sales tax except Ohio.
 

What is a Patient Lift?

Patient lifts allow a person with limited mobility to be moved safely when properly used. Patient lifts are intended to lift and transfer patients from the wheelchair to the commode; bed to the wheelchair; from the floor to the bed or chair with minimal physical effort from the caregiver. They may be used by means of a power source with a rechargeable battery or manually with a hydraulic system. The reason patients lifts are becoming so popular is because of the rise in back injuries to caregivers and medical personnel associated with lifting and transferring patients. The biggest reason for the use of patient lifts is because using a patient lift instead of trying to physically move a person in and out of bed is greatly improved and less traumatic to the patients skin and body with a patient lift.

The most important thing when looking for a patient lift is making sure the weight capacity is high enough and the patient is able to benefit from the use of a lift. Also make sure you choose the correct patient lift sling for the patient and application you are intending to use it for. See our sling section for more information on each style of sling or call customer service if you are hesitant on the type lift/sling combination that will work best for you.

There are 3 Types Patient Lifts:

Manual Patient lifts:

Manual lifts, also known as Hydraulic Lifts, are completely operated by the attendant or caregiver with the use of a hydraulic hand pump. The hydraulic pumps are simple to use regardless of the patient's weight because the hydraulic system lessens the weight that the caregiver has to move. These lifts are the most economical choice for moving dependent patients or when the room does not have easy access to a power source. It may be difficult for single caregivers to simultaneous use the pump operation and give the patient the proper care so it is recommended that two attendants operate this type of patient lift when moving a patient.

Electric Patient Lifts:

Electric or Power lifts are powered either through a standard electrical outlet or by a re-chargeable battery. All electric lifts can be operated manually as a back-up in the case of a power failure. The lifting is controlled through a hand control that requires no physical exertion from the caregiver. The attached remote control gives caregivers the freedom to focus on patent care. The high-torque electric motors are capable of lifting from 350-lbs up to 600-lbs. See each model for specific specifications.

Sit-to-Stand Lifts or Standing Assist Lifts (see here for info)

The sit-to-stand lift is designed to help patients with some mobility but who lack the strength or muscle control to rise to a standing position. Depending on how much weight bearing capacity the patient has, the sit-to-stand lift can raise the patient just high enough for short distance transfers such as bed to wheelchair or wheelchair to commode, or to a fully standing posture for longer distance transfers. Use of a sit-to-stand lift requires the patient to be able to sit up with or without assistance, to physically support their own weight while in a standing position and to be able to bend their hips, knees, and ankles. Sit-to-stand lifts fix the patient legs in position exerting pressure on the patient's caves as the belt or strap is tightened by the lift mechanism. This tightening gradually moves the patient's body diagonally into a standing position.

How to Use a Patient Lift:

A patient lift is a type of apparatus that helps medical personnel lift and caregivers to  transport patients who are non-ambulatory and may be too heavy to lift manually. Patient lifts are commonly used in home care settings, extended-care centers, hospices, nursing homes and hospitals. They are easy to use and can prevent serious back injuries to the caregivers and staff. They may be operated by means of a power source with a rechargeable battery or manually with a hydraulic system. Manual Patient lifts that are operated by a hand pump are easy to use and are the most popular because of price.

IMPORTANT: Before using a patient lift, please read and adhersafety precautions and warnings. Electric Patient Lift Failure to do so could result in serious injury or damage to you and/or the patient lift.

Before lifting anyone with a patient lift, practice with by using a helper, not the patient. It is important to understand how the lift will feel with a patient in it. Be sure to explain the lifting process to the patient before attempting to lift them the first time. The patient's weight must be centered over the base legs at all times. Do not lift a patient with the mast/boom assembly swiveled to either side. Always keep patient facing the caregiver operating the lift.

NOTE: Although it is recommended that two caregivers be used for all lifting preparation, transferring from and transferring to procedures, most equipment will permit proper operation by one caregiver. The use of one caregiver is based on the evaluation of the health care professional for each individual case.

DO NOT engage the rear locking casters when patient is in the lift. The wheels must be FREE to roll to allow the lift to center itself beneath the patient.

DO NOT roll the caster base over objects such as shag or deep pile carpeting, raised carpet bindings, thresholds, unpaved surfaces, outdoors, or any other obstructions that would create an imbalance of the patient lift. This could cause the patient lift to tip over.

 NEVER exceed the maximum weight capacity of the lifter.

NEVER push or pull on the lift boom. Pushing or pulling on the boom can cause the patient lift to tip over.

NEVER use the patient lift  to lift or transfer anything other than a patient.

To reduce the hazard of tipping over, spread the adjustable base on the ptient lift to their widest position before lifting anyone.

Use restraint straps for comatose, spastic, agitated or severely handicapped patients. Use restraints with a patient lift only with a physician’s prescription.

Be sure to check that the loops of the patient lift slings are securely attached to the lift hooks, as unsecured loops could result in slippage and injury to both the patient and the operator.

To prevent injury, keep open communication with the patient if possible. Ask the patient if heor she is comfortable and assure the patient that he or she will only be in the patient lift sling for a short time.

To Raise Lift: Base of lift must be spread to widest possible position. Push the up button.

Manual Patient LiftTo Lower Lift: Press down button. After patient reaches seat, push down on boom to slacken straps or chains.

-Warning-

Lifts can tip over. Keep base widened for stability. Never lock wheel locks or block wheels when lifting someone. Wheel locks are provided for parking. To lock casters, step on lever on top of casters. To unlock, step on off lever.

Manual Lift

To Raise Lift: Base of lift must be spread to widest possible position to maximize stability. Pump hydraulic handle. Steering handle may be held to steady lift.

To Lower Patient Lift: Open hydraulic pressure release knob by turning it counter clockwise, no more than one full turn. Release knob is located on the pump or near the pump handle.

Note – Manual Pump

  1. Use pump to raise boom to position for lifting patient.
  2. DO NOT lift up on end of boom to position for lifting patient as this causes air to be drawn in under ram, preventing lift pump from lifting when handle is pumped.
  3. DO NOT press down hard on handle when bottom of stroke is reached.
  4. It is common occurrence after a few hours of non-use for the boom to lower with no weight suspended from the end of the boom. This is not a faulty lift pump.

The Patient Sling

The Full Body Patient Sling is the most commonly used sling for transferring patients. Consult your sling manual on how to fold the sling before placing under patient. Folding the sling makes for less work. The Patient Sling wraps around the thighs and back to give the patient a secure feeling and prevent patients from sliding out of the sling.

WASHING INSTRUCTIONS For Most Patient Slings:

Machine wash with warm or cold water. Air dry or use very low heat in a dryer. DO NOT USE BLEACH. Do not wash with other colors. If it is a two piece patient sling that comes with the metal bars the bars and seat hangers of the two-piece slings are not removable. It is recommended that these be hand washed.)

Applying the Patient Sling From Lying Position:

  1. Roll patient so they are resting on their side. Place the folded sling behind patient's back and roll patient onto their back and the sling.
  2. Pull the leg loops forward and under the thigh.

Patient Lift Transfer from the Bed:

  1. With the legs of the base open and locked, use the steering handle to push the patient lift into position. The cradle should be located just over the patient.
  2. Lower the patient lift to easily attach the sling to their respective sides of the cradle.
  3. Patient Lift Transfer from the Bed
  4. Pump the lift handle (manual) or press the UP button (electric) to raise the patient above the bed. The patient should be elevated high enough to clear the bed with their weight fully supported by the lift. (View Detail A)
  5. NOTE: On manual lifts, the boom will stay in position until the control valve is opened. On the electric lifts, the boom will stay in position until the DOWN button is pressed.

    Patient Lift Transfer from the Bed
  6. When the patient is clear of the bed surface, gently turn patient so their legs dangle off side off the bed.  Lower bed if you need more clearance.
  7. When moving the patient lift away from the bed, turn the patient so that he/she faces the caregiver operating the patient lift and is centered over the base of the lift. (View Detail B)
  8. Press the DOWN button (electric) or open the control valve (manual) lowering patient so that his feet rest on the base of the lift, straddling the mast. Close the control valve if using a manual lift. (View Detail C)

NOTE: The lower center of gravity provides stability making the patient feel more secure and the lift easier to move.

  1. Pull the patient lift away from the bed and then push it from behind with both hands firmly on the steering handle.

Using Patient Lift to Transfer to Bed

  1. Raise lift until patient’s buttocks are above the surface of the bed. You may need to lower the bed height. If patient cannot be lifted above the bed, DO NOT push or pull the patient. This can result in a tip over and serious injury to the patient and caregiver.
  2. Move Patient lift so that the open end of the base is as far under the bed as possible.
  3. After patient has been centered over the bed, rotate the patient so that he/she face the foot of the bed.
  4. Carefully lower the patient onto bed.
  5. Remove straps or chains from sling.

 NOTE: If patient needs support and is in a hospital bed raise side rails and have patient hold onto them. Raise the bed to the highest position before moving the patient onto the sling. This will reduce strain on the caregiver's back. Also, when the patient is prepared to be lifted, lower the side rail and level of the bed back down, decreasing the distance the patient has to be elevated.

 NOTE: If it is necessary to close the legs of the lift to maneuver the lift under a bed, close the legs of the lift only as long as it takes to position the lift over the patient and lift the patient off the surface of the bed. When the legs of the lift are no longer under the bed, return the legs of the lift to the maximum open position and lock the shifter handle immediately.

 To reduce the risk of tipping over, spread the adjustable base legs to their widest position before lifting anyone.

 Beware of obstructions under the bed that can cause the patient lift wheels to stop and the patient lift to tip over.

DO NOT engage the rear locking casters when patient is in the patient lift.

DO NOT roll the caster base over objects such as shag or deep pile carpeting, raised carpet bindings, thresholds, unpaved surfaces, outdoors, or any other obstructions that would create an imbalance of the patient lift. This could cause the patient lift to tip over.

Patient Lift Transfer to a Wheelchair

  1. The adjustable base legs (with patient) are spread until they are in their widest position.
  2. The wheelchair is moved into position between the two legs of the patient lift facing the mast of the lift and the caregiver.Patient Lift Transfer to a Wheelchair
  3. Position the lift so that the patient is as far back in the chair as possible. Always be sure to lock the wheelchair brakes but NOT the lift breaks.
  4. Begin to lower the patient carefully into the chair.
  5. To position, push gently on the knees of the patient with your right or left hand while simultaneously lowering the patient into the chair.

    Other alternatives for positioning the patient further back into the chair are as follows:

    1. Raise the patient so that he/she is just touching the seat.
    2. Pull up on the top and back of the sling with left hand.
    3. Complete lowering the patient into the chair.
    4. Raise the patient and repeat steps B-C if necessary.
  6. Unhook the sling from the cradle or the chains or straps attached to sling.
  7. Leave the sling in place if for short periods of time. We always recommend that if the patient is going to be sitting in on the sling for more then a few hours the sling should be taken out from under their bottom to prevent the sling from bunching up and causing any skin issues on the patients bottom area.

NOTE: Remove only if a divided leg sling was used.

NOTE: Use the straps or handles on the side and the back of the sling to guide the patient’s hips as far back as possible into the seat for proper positioning.

Transfer Patient from Wheelchair

  1. Fold the patient sling appropriately.
  2. Lean the patient forward and place his arms on his knees for stability. Standing in front of the patient, put the folded sling behind the patient’s back and press it down until it touches the seat of the chair.
  3. The leg sections of the sling are pulled forward and beneath the patient’s thighs by the long loops.
  4. The loops are then crossed one loop through the other loop.
  5. Attach the sling to the cradle.
  6. Move the lift base around the chair and under the leg rest with the patient’s feet straddling the mast.
  7. Lock the wheelchair brakes. Raise the patient above seat height. Make sure that the footrests are in the up position.

Removing Patient Sling from Under Patient:

NOTE: It is not necessary to remove the sling unless desired by the patient or if they will be sitting or laying on the patient sling for long periods of time to prevent any skin issues the sling may cause.

  1. Remove the armrests from the chair if possible (optional). Disconnect the patient sling from the patient lift.
  2. Stand in front of the patient, lean the patient forward and place his arms on his knees for stability.
  3. Pull the sling flaps to the side, out from under patient’s thighs.
  4. Still standing in front of patient reach back and pull the sling up from behind the patient.
  5. Reposition the patient into the chair.

Transferring for Commode Use

The lift bases are designed to provide access to most bathrooms and can be used with commodes.

NOTE: It is suggested that the sling be left connected during bathroom use.

  1. Position lift base around commode.
  2. NOTE: The patient should be elevated high enough to clear the commode chair arms and have their weight supported by the patient lift.

  3. Position patient over commode and gently lower. Unhook the front flaps of sling and pull them out of the way.
  4. When finished, hook up and check to make sure all hooks are secure.
  5. Raise lift until patient’s buttocks are clear of the commode.
  6. Move lift away from commode and lower patient for transport.

Transferring to a Bathing Unit:

Transferring for Commode
  1. The patient should be elevated high enough to clear the bed and be able to slide the portable bath tub under the patient.
  2. Lower the patient into the portable bath tub.
  3. Detach the sling from the swivel bar hooks and attach the portable bath tub straps to the patient lift.
  4. Using the lift, raise the sides of the portable bath tub.
  5. Bathe the patient.
  6. Reverse the procedures to return the patient to bed.

-WARNING-

When the sling is elevated a few inches off the surface of the bed and before moving the patient, check to make sure that the sling is properly connected to the hooks on the cradle of the patient lift. If any attachments are NOT properly in place, lower the patient back onto the stationary surface and correct this problem - otherwise, injury or damage may occur.

Adjustments for safety and comfort should be made before moving the patient. The patient's arms should be inside the straps.

It is recommend that the rear casters be left unlocked during lifting procedures to allow the patient lift to stabilize itself when the patient is initially lifted from a chair, bed or any stationary object.

It is recommended that the sling remain connected to the swivel bar hooks during the patient’s use of either the commode chair or standard commode.

The legs of the lift must be in the maximum open position and the patient lift handle locked in place for optimum stability and safety.

If it is necessary to close the legs of the patient lift to maneuver the hoyer lift under a bed, close the legs of the patient lift only as long as it takes to position the lift over the patient and lift the patient off the surface of the bed. When the legs of the patient lift are no longer under the bed, return the legs of the lift to the maximum open position and lock the shifter handle immediately.

The slings with commode openings are designed to be used with either a commode chair or standard commode.

NOTE: Patient lifts are NOT intended as a transport device. Moving a person suspended in a sling over any distance is NOT recommended. If the bathroom facilities are NOT near the bed or if the patient lift cannot be easily maneuvered towards the commode, then the patient MUST be transferred to a wheelchair and transported to the bathroom facilities before using the patient lift again to position the patient on a standard commode.

NOTE: Before transferring the patient, the patient lift should be guided to the bathroom to check that it can be easily maneuvered towards the commode.

Lowering Patient to the Floor:

  1. Place pillow on base support legs.
  2. Lower patient down to the floor.

NOTE: Keep patient facing caregiver

Lifting Patient from the Floor:

  1. Position the lift behind the patient with a pillow over the base to support the patient’s head and neck. Patient Lift should be positioned with the lift arm centered over the patient.
  2. Lower the cradle to that the chains or straps reach the hooks of the sling or cradle.
  3. Raise the patient’s knees and attach the sling to the cradle.
  4. Lift the patient up above the floor. Turn the patient to face the caregiver and place the patient’s feet on the base of the patient lift straddling the mast for extra stability.

Most frequently Asked Questions About our Patient lifts:

  1. Does the patient lifts you sell ship for free? Yes every patient lift we sell ships free and there is no sales tax instead in the state of Ohio.
  2. Are your patients lifts new? Yes every patient lift we sell comes brand new with a manufacturers warranty delivered right to your location.
  3. Do you bill insurance or medicare? Unfortunately we do not bill medicare, Medicaid or any private insurances if you purchase a patient lift from us. Usually you will find as cheap as we are that once you figure in your deductible and co pays that we will end up being cheaper than going through your insurance.
  4. Can I use any of these patient lifts to get someone in and out of the bath tub? None of the patients lifts we sell will allow the mast to not be over top of the legs.  The patient lifts used for getting someone over the edge of the bathtub and lower them in would be a overhead ceiling lift which we do not sell.
  5. How long does it take to receive your patient lift? Almost every patient lift we sell ships within 24 hours from several different locations across the country so a typical delivery is 1-3 days from when you place a order. If you need it quicker or want to make sure it is in stock in the warehouse close to you please call our customer service representatives to answer your questions.

Please wait...

Successfully added to cart

Continue shopping
or
Continue shopping
or